Noon at Noodles & Company - Entire Lecture Series

For one Wednesday a month in February, March, and April, join us at Noodles & Company in Eastland Plaza for three diverse presentations.

Lectures run from 12–1 p.m. If you plan to purchase lunch at Noodles, please arrive by 11:30 a.m. Order your lunch and head back to the conference room for the presentation, or stay and enjoy lunch after the lecture. Either way, Eastland Plaza has plenty of free parking, so accessibility is easy.

About the Course

Whatever your day might look like, plan to save lunchtime for us! For one Wednesday a month in February, March, and April, join us at Noodles & Company in Eastland Plaza for three diverse presentations.

Lectures run from 12–1 p.m.... See more If you plan to purchase lunch at Noodles, please arrive by 11:30 a.m. Order your lunch and head back to the conference room for the presentation, or stay and enjoy lunch after the lecture. Either way, Eastland Plaza has plenty of free parking, so accessibility is easy.

 

Wednesday, February, 26

An Incomplete and Unauthorized History of Indiana University

Indiana University traces its roots to the Indiana State Seminary founded by the Indiana General Assembly on Jan. 20, 1820. As IU celebrates and commemorates its 200th anniversary throughout the 2019–2020 academic year, we have been asking new questions about the development of the university in Bloomington and throughout the state of Indiana.This session will feature new stories about IU and will include an interactive live history quiz and prizes!

Instructor: Kelly A. Kish is director of the Office of the IU Bicentennial and deputy chief of staff in the Office of the President. She holds a BA in Government and Politics/Russian Area Studies from the University of Maryland, an MA in Higher Education Administration, and a PhD in Higher Education Administration both from Indiana University. In 2015, she assumed the position of director of the IU Bicentennial, overseeing the commemoration of this important university milestone with a multi-year, multi-campus, academically focused program of 27 signature projects, two grant funds, and a student internship program.

 

Wednesday, March, 25

20/20 Vision in 2020

This interactive course will explore the human eye from childhood to maturity. Refractive conditions such as myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), astigmatism, and presbyopia will be discussed. Pathological conditions such as cataracts, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration will be presented, as well as recent developments in refractive and ocular disease management.

Instructor: Susan Kovacich, OD, FAAO, received both her Bachelor of Arts and Doctor of Optometry degrees from Indiana University. After optometry school, she completed a hospital-based residency in ocular disease at the John Cochran VAMC in St. Louis, Missouri. She remained in St. Louis for several years, practicing primary care optometry at an HMO followed by four years with a corneal specialist. She joined the IU School of Optometry faculty as a clinical assistant professor in 1998. Dr. Kovacich is active in many optometric associations and has published in several optometric journals. She is very active with the IUAA and is currently on the Executive Council.

 

Wednesday, April, 22

Remembering Chernobyl: The History of A Disaster

We will examine how the nuclear accident in the Chernobyl power plant on April 26, 1986 became one of the worst environmental catastrophes ever, a human tragedy, and a trigger for political reforms in the Soviet Union. The Soviet nuclear program was a part of the modern world history of technology, significantly changing the economy and playing a key role in the Cold War arms race. Chernobyl revealed how the Soviet system functioned and why drastic reforms were needed. Its long-lasting environmental impact created an abandoned radiation zone near the town Pripyat (now in Ukraine), frozen in time and populated by mutated animals, a major tourist attraction today and recently pictured in the HBO series Chernobyl. In this course we will watch video clips documenting the nuclear accident and interviews with people who lived in Pripyat, and we will discuss how Chernobyl is both remembered and forgotten.

Instructor: Tatiana Saburova was born in Siberia and studied history in Omsk Pedagogical University where she was teaching from 1996 till 2016. She was a visiting Professor at Indiana University in 2016-17 and at University of Alberta in 2018.  Now she is a lecturer and academic director of the Russian Studies Workshop in Indiana University. Her first book published in 2005 was on the social and cultural representations of Russian intellectuals in the 19th century. The second book A Generation of Revolutionaries: Nikolai Charushin and Russian Populism from the Great Reforms to Perestroika was co-authored with Ben Eklof (Indiana University) and published by Indiana University Press in 2017. Her current research focuses on the history of photography in Russia, biography, autobiography, and memory. She is teaching classes "The Making of Modern Russia", "Siberia: Russia's Wild East", and "Photographing History".



Course At-A-Glance

Fee:  $35.00
  Fee Does Not Include Lunch
  Fee Includes Three Noon @ Noodles Classes

Course Sections

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